Runners persevere through thick and thin

September 15, 2011 — by Jennifer Jin

Members of the track and cross-country teams are expected to grind out their workouts and put in their miles—even it means getting pelted by hail or slogging through rain and mud. Some even enjoy what other would consider torture.

Members of the track and cross-country teams are expected to grind out their workouts and put in their miles—even it means getting pelted by hail or slogging through rain and mud. Some even enjoy what other would consider torture.

“My freshman year we ran in the worst rain I’ve ever seen; it was like a tropical rainstorm [but] it was so much fun,” cross-country runner junior Suzannah Osekowsky said. “We laughed at the people whose umbrellas were blown inside-out and we splashed in puddles. It was absolutely fantastic!”

Even those who did not enjoy running in the rain were still able to have a good time.

“It’s actually quite funny watching everyone huddled under the bleachers trying to aviod the rain and jumping over monster puddles so that they don’t get soaked,” senior high jumper Michelle Arifin said.

However, some people did not have as fun an experience.

“One time we had to do [ab workouts] on the wet track and when I got I up had this orange-red colored stain on my shorts, ” track member junior Michael Cheung said. “ It was kind of disgusting.”
In addition the pouring rain, it will sometimes hail.

“The one thing I hate the most is when it rains and hails at the same time,” hurdler senior Isabel McPherson said. “ Not only is it wet, it’s also really painful.”

After runners become accustomed to inclement weather, they must re-adapt to hot weather. At first the heat is unbearable, but the runners acclimate, and some even gain a competitive advantage by running under the sweltering sun.

“Because we run during the hottest part of the day, we learn to deal with the heat,” cross-country runner junior Kiki Shim said. “During some race courses, there is no shade, so running a sunny course helps you get prepared for that.”

When running in the heat, runners get tired and thirsty easily, so most runners try to avoid running in the heat as much as possible.

Even in good weather, running long distances is no easy feat, but after a couple miles, it becomes a pleasant run.

“I love the relaxing and numb feeling you get after you’re on your third mile. You can feel your feet moving under you but you’re not really putting that much effort into running,” Shim said. “ It’s an odd feeling but an enjoyable one.”

No matter the obstacles, practices become enjoyable with friends.

“As long as I have fun with my friends while running, it’s all good,” sophomore cross-country runner Stephanie Ho said. “It makes the longest runs go by in a flash.”

Even though some runners do not enjoy running in unfavorable conditions, they all agree that it pays off in the end.

“Sweat is greater than regret,” said junior cross-country runner Maya Nag. “ That’s my motto.”

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