Obama deserves Nobel Peace Prize

October 30, 2009 — by Anoop Galivanche and Jason Wu

When President Obama was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, reactions ranged from anger to utter disbelief. Even the president himself admitted he did not feel he had done enough to deserve being awarded a prize given to the likes of Martin Luther King Jr. and Nelson Mandela.

Conservatives have had a field day with the announcement, going as far as to demean the century-old prize that is among the most prestigious awards in existence. What the critics fail to realize, however, is that Obama was not awarded the prize for what he has done, but rather for what he will do.

Thus far, the intentions President Obama has indicated merit an award themselves. The havoc the Bush administration wreaked by taking irrationally hardline stances on nuclear weapons and other delicate diplomatic issues caused irreparable harm to the stability of America’s global and domestic reputation.

Iran and North Korea refuse to submit to Western demands, and the United States’ hegemony is declining at a rate proportional to the spiraling cost of the War on Terror. Obama entered his presidency with these lingering issues, and the American public expects him to fix them.

Like many other politicians, Obama pointed out the problems going on in the world and promised to solve them. But what sets him apart is how he has actually taken steps to make good on these election promises. He has reopened communication with Russia, is pushing for multi-lateral talks with North Korea and has extended an olive branch to Iran. Obama has done more good during his few months in office than many previous presidents have done in their entire terms.

But the prize is more than just preemptive recognition. The influential Nobel committee is, in effect, affirming his afflictions and blessing his beliefs. This is precisely the kind of recognition Obama needs to gain respect from world leaders who are still unsure of his potential. After all, behind his ambitious facade, Obama is vastly different from virtually all previous American presidents. He is a young, self-made African-American man. With a Nobel Peace Prize under his belt, he will have the credibility necessary to tackle the complex problems across the globe.

Obama is one of the world’s best hopes for peace. His background is unique for an American president, and this, coupled with his influence as president of the United States, puts him in a position to remove the obstacles hampering world peace. And his willingness to fully utilize this power makes him deserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Now we can only hope peace itself will follow.

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