‘The Jungle Book’ revival transforms comical animation

April 25, 2016 — by Frederick Kim

Following Disney’s trend of converting animated classics into live-action movies, the industry recently released “The Jungle Book” in theaters on April 15, bringing the 1967 animated classic back to life.

 

“The Jungle Book” shines brightly on the silver screen and all the animals become quiet except for the ranting Mowgli the man-cub. I stop eating my popcorn in anticipation of what will happen next. Suddenly, Shere Khan, the man-hating tiger, jumps out of the high grass to catch Mowgli, stifling a scream from a nearby girl.

Following Disney’s trend of converting animated classics into live-action movies, the industry recently released “The Jungle Book” in theaters on April 15, bringing the 1967 animated classic back to life.

Before indulging in the new movie, I decided to watch the old animation. I found the old movie to be quite intriguing with its comical aspects and catchy sing-along songs, such as “The Bare Necessities” and “I Wanna Be Like You.”

The general storyline, based on Rudyard Kipling’s old Indian tale, follows Mowgli, who is abandoned at birth and adopted by the wolf pack in the jungle. Mowgli lives happily until Shere Khan returns to the jungle and tries to hunt him down.

One of the movie’s significant strengths is its imagery: Viewers can see how far technological innovation has advanced from the fur and movement. Everything from the animals to the background looks extremely realistic, making the animals appear smooth and natural.

After watching the trailer, I noticed several similarities with the old animation, such as the storyline and humor; what was different was the tone. In particular, the dramatic music and violent battle scenes made the remake seem more sinister than the animation.

Compared to the original, the new rendition is suspenseful and action-packed.

Although it didn’t include the same ending and the scene with the vultures, the movie surpassed my expectations. The new film didn’t stray too far from the original story, and many aspects of the original animation were incorporated to create a nostalgic feel. The graphics were top-notch and the soundtrack established a dark tone.

This intense movie will appeal to a wide audience, from small children to teenagers to adults, as Disney pushed the limits of computer graphics and created a dramatic tone to capture the audience.

 
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