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The Saratoga Falcon

The Saratoga Falcon

Seniors choose to cast their votes in upcoming election

Growing up, birthdays often correspond with important milestones in a young person’s life—each one special in its own way. One’s 18th birthday is especially momentous, for it is the year a child turns into an adult, a transition that comes responsibilities and rewards, including the opportunity to vote and thereby voice opinions on the government.  
Senior Eric Castronovo plans to take advantage of his chance to vote in the upcoming election this November.
“I’m 18 and I can [vote] so I might as well … but do I know anything about voting?” Castronovo said. “No.”
According to Castronovo, he plans to learn the ropes and gain experience for the next time he votes.
Castronovo said there is “practice that I want to get in … so when I go to vote later I know how. It’s better to learn now than when I’m 22.” 
Castronovo feels it is necessary that he use this opportunity. 
“I think it is important to vote because I have the right to vote, and if I don't vote then I feel like I am just wasting an opportunity to make myself heard,” Castronovo said. 
Although many of his friends are not old enough to vote, Castronovo said he is comfortable voting while still in high school.
“I feel like everyone’s going to vote sooner or later so it’s just normal,” Castronovo said.
Senior Gabby Crolla will also be 18 by the election and, like Castronovo, has decided to vote.  
“I decided to vote because I felt that, as a person, by voting I could contribute … to my community and government by choosing a good leader,” Crolla said.
Crolla said that she is very excited about the process, but it does have some drawbacks.
“I'm looking forward to actually casting my vote,” Crolla said. “I'm not looking forward to what might happen if the person I voted for didn't get elected.”
Nevertheless, Crolla sees the necessity of voting.
“It is important to vote because as a person you can make a difference for the good of the country and government,” Crolla said. “One vote can mean tipping the balance of who wins the election.”
Crolla feels that she knows enough about the candidates to make a responsible decision.
“I have already educated myself on the election simply by watching the news for a couple minutes or just engaging in conversation with my parent about it,” Crolla said. “Sometimes I go by what I learn in school and in history class.” 
 Senior Corinne Moran is also planning to vote in the upcoming election.
“My family is pretty political and talking about politics all the time so … I think it’s just something that interests me,” Moran said.
However, Moran said she does not feel pressured by her family or friends to vote in any certain way.
“My dad is a really big advocate of researching stuff for yourself,” Moran said.  “[My parents] don’t like to put too many of their opinions on me, so I  do my own work and figure it out for myself.” 
Interestingly, Moran feels that among her peers  only some are serious about their candidate choices.
“I think some people do actually want to vote and take the time to research and look into it but then there [are] other people who vote just to vote,” Moran said.
Moran feels that it is important to be responsible with this process.
“I think voting is a very personal thing,” Moran said. “But I do think if you're going to vote, it would be smart to know what exactly you're voting for.”
Moran said she had mixed feelings about this new opportunity.
“It’s kind of cool,” Moran said.  “I feel older, an actual adult now, but it’s kind of weird at the same time.”
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