Students write love on their arms

December 3, 2008 — by Mary Mykhaylova

Many students came to school on Nov. 13 with arms embellished with pens and sharpies that spelled out a single word–love. These students were participating in a national day of awareness, To Write Love on Her Arms Day.

This symbolic event was hosted by the non-profit organization, To Write Love on Her Arms (TWLOHA), whose goal is to present people with hope and find help for those struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury and suicidal thoughts. According to its website, TWLOHA’s vision is, “the possibility that your best days are ahead…that we’re more loved than we’ll ever know. The vision is hope, and hope is real. You are not alone, and this is not the end of your story.”

TWLOHA sought to raise awareness by holding their second To Write Love on Her Arms day on Nov. 13. The act of writing “Love” on one’s arms is meant as a symbolic reminder to replace pain with love and hope. The concept of TWLOHA day became known to Saratoga High students through a Facebook event, and many students took an active part in raising awareness by writing the word on their arms–some simple, others intricate and tattoo-esque.

“I participated because [this day was a] way to show to these kids, who think no one cares, that someone does,” said junior Adele Perera.
The founder of the organization was first inspired after urging a girl suffering from all the struggles mentioned above to seek help, and watching her recover. Her full story can be read on the website, and can also be found on the inside on some of the shirts that TWLOHA produces.

The organization offers a variety of merchandise, which was at first solely available through TWLOHA’s webpage, but can now also be found at Hot Topic stores.

TWLOHA gained publicity through Myspace, the Warped Tour and its Street Team which works to advertise the organization to make a bigger impact.

“I’m really glad [TWLOHA] was founded and has been successful since it addresses an important issue that is often overlooked,” Perera said.

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