Chik-Fil-A shows lack of judgment, less chicken eaten

September 4, 2012 — by Carol Suh and Karen Sung
Photo by Washington Post

Customers walking into a local Chick-fil-a. 

Gay rights activists, politicians and even the Muppets have spoken out against Chick-Fil-A’s president Dan Cathy for his “prejudiced statements” against same sex marriage.

Gay rights activists, politicians and even the Muppets have spoken out against Chick-Fil-A’s president Dan Cathy for his “prejudiced statements” against same sex marriage. Over the summer, Cathy, in an interview with a Baptist newspaper, boldly declared, “…I pray God’s mercy on our generation that has such a prideful, arrogant attitude to think that we have the audacity to try to redefine what marriage is about.” 
Cathy’s comments spurred passionate speeches rallying against the restaurant’s stance, mass protests, boycotts and even a national “Same Sex Kiss Day at Chick-Fil-A.” Reactions to this public declaration of anti-gay support range from two girls innocuously kissing in front of the restaurant to violent harassment of workers. 
Reminiscent of another media drama this past summer regarding Oreos (in which hordes boycotted the brand, which announced itself as pro-gay), response to the chain’s beliefs has quickly spiralled out of control. While the public reaction shows a beneficial progression of our country as we become increasingly supportive for gay rights, many advocates have overstepped their self-declared representation of the gay rights community.
Regardless of the restaurant chain’s stance, Cathy still retains the right, under the law, to state and express its beliefs without intense subjugation. However, the decision to do so was a rash and unwise mistake, causing a headache for the company. 
Especially as the chain begins to expand across the nation, this public relations and media nightmare has greatly damaged its public image. Chick-Fil-A was previously ranked 65 on the Index score, which ranks overall quality and satisfaction of fast food restaurants, well above the national average of 46, but the score has since fallen to 43. 
All across the nation, from college students to mayors, including San Francisco’s mayor Edwin Lee, people have vowed to ban Chick-Fil-A from establishing restaurants in their city. A proposed restaurant in Mountain View was terminated after locals protested vehemently. Even Yahoo offered a recipe on its front page for a DIY version of Chick-Fil-A’s previously beloved chicken, touted as “a copycat version” of the infamous fried chicken sandwich.
At the end of the day, the whole scene was a senseless exercise of the rights stated in the First Amendment. Although the fate of the restaurant is still to be determined, the previously beloved restaurant is now in a precarious position. 
When even the Muppet characters revoke their partnership and remove their face from Chick-Fil-A’s kids meals, it becomes clear that the restaurant chain has dug itself into a deep hole.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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