Administrative action justified in its crackdown on pot

March 28, 2014 — by Jonathan Young

The shrill beep of the school bell reverberates throughout the halls, signaling the start of tutorial. Succumbing to ritual, upperclassmen rush to the cars and some gather in circles throughout the lot while others enter the warmth of their motor vehicles.

The shrill beep of the school bell reverberates throughout the halls, signaling the start of tutorial. Succumbing to ritual, upperclassmen rush to the cars and some gather in circles throughout the lot while others enter the warmth of their motor vehicles. This is a constant, never changing. 
One element has disrupted the usual monotony. Recently, assistant principal Kevin Mount, along with campus supervisors, has taken to “the lot” and has been walking around checking in on students’ actions. Mount’s actions are a direct response to recent drug activity occurring on campus, mostly centering around marijuana.
Some students deride the administration’s actions, but he is merely doing his job, preventing illicit activities from taking place on school property. Students often complain about why the administration isn’t “doing something more important” or “leaving the students to their own business.” The administration’s business is the students.
I do not believe in drug use or condone it. But I’m also not here to preach that drug use is bad and how no one should do it. Instead, I will focus on a defense of the administrators’ actions against illegal substances.
There is no way to completely control and enforce the use of drugs in a given area, but sometimes a little common sense can go a long way. 
One misconception is that there has been a spike in marijuana usage this year compared to other years. Most likely, this is false. The use of marijuana has not suddenly escalated; instead, the use has merely been more open and public. 
Students are being increasingly careless with possession and use of this drug. If one chooses to partake in these activities, the consequences of which are clearly outlined by the school, one must utilize some common sense.
Another misconception is that marijuana is not the most terrible thing in the world and its use is not a big deal. This is a common excuse attempting to justify the use of the drug, but it is flawed.
Marijuana is a gateway drug that may lead to other more serious drugs. The whole point is not whether marijuana itself is dangerous, but what the use of marijuana can lead to. The administration’s concern is reasonable and merited — it wants to protect its students from the adverse side effects of the drug, not necessarily the drug itself and it is merely enforcing existing laws.
As everyone should know, the use of marijuana is against state law and its distribution is a federal crime. The school cannot just turn a blind eye to it. 
While marijuana itself may not be the “worst thing in the world,” the administration should not be blamed for the actions they’ve taken.
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